Menu

The Eli Review Blog

Archived posts from the category "Pedagogy"

blog post featured image

You CAN fit in an Eli Review free trial before the end of Spring 2017

Like you, I’m counting down the days until the semester wraps up. My first-year writing students at a community college are working on finishing up a fourth major project. We’re all tired. To do our best work now, we need tiny goals. By assigning reviews that focus on only one aspect of the final draft, […]

Read More
blog post featured image

Giver’s Gain in Peer Learning

Bill Hart-Davidson uses the catchphrase “giver’s gain” to describe the benefits of being a helpful reviewer. Giver’s gain comes from actively thinking alongside another writer: What you read, you too can imitate. What you detect, you too can correct. What you explain, you too can remember. What you suggest, you too can try. It can […]

Read More
blog post featured image

“Doneness” and Revision

Eli puts so much emphasis on feedback in order to drive revision because that’s where learning happens. Getting students to revise is hard work, even if they’ve gotten excellent comments from peers and the instructor’s debriefing. In their article in the Fall 2016 Composition Studies, Rob McAlear and Mark Pedretti reported two of the 10 […]

Read More
blog post featured image

Helpfulness Ratings You Can Trust

In Eli Review, writers can rate the feedback they received based on how helpful they found it. Helpfulness ratings allow writers to show reviewers the extent to which a comment will help them revise. Writers see reviewers’ comments (with a link to the contextual location in the draft where the reviewer left that comment). Like […]

Read More
blog post featured image

Editorial: Lines of Sight

This post by Jeff Grabill (@grabill), co-inventor of Eli Review, was originally published by the Hub for Innovation in Learning and Technology at Michigan State University, reprinted here with permission. It is the first in a three-part series on educational technology. I occupy an interesting position. The conflict of interest officials at my university describe it as “conflicted,” which […]

Read More

upward arrow button